THE IMPORTANCE OF SOCIAL SKILLS THERAPY

Social skills are ways of dealing with others that create healthy and positive interactions. Children who have social skills can communicate clearly, calmly, and respectfully.

Also, many people have not learned to “read” the many subtle cues contained in social interactions, such as how to tell when someone wants to change the topic of conversation or shift to another activity. Social skills training helps patients to learn to interpret these and other social signals so that they can determine how to act appropriately in the company of other people in a variety of different situations.

When people improve their social skills or change selected behaviours, they will raise their self-esteem and increase the likelihood that others will respond favourably to them. Trainees learn to change their social behaviour patterns by practicing selected behaviours in individual or group therapy sessions. Another goal of social skills training is improving a patient’s ability to function in everyday social situations. Social skills training can help patients to work on specific issuesfor example, improving one’s telephone mannersthat interfere with their jobs or daily lives.

A person who lacks certain social skills may have great difficulty building a network of supportive friends and acquaintances as he or she grows older, and may become socially isolated. Moreover, one of the consequences of loneliness is an increased risk of developing emotional problems or mental disorders. Social skills training has been shown to be effective in treating patients with a broad range of emotional problems and diagnoses. Some of the disorders treated by social skills trainers include shyness; adjustment disorders; marital and family conflicts, anxiety disorders, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, social phobia, alcohol dependence; depression; bipolar disorder; schizophrenia; developmental disabilities; avoidant personality disorder; paranoid.

A specific example of how social skills training can be helpful includes its application to alcohol dependence. In treating patients with alcohol dependence, a therapist who is using social skills training focuses on teaching the patients ways to avoid drinking when they go to parties where alcohol is served, or when they find themselves in other situations in which others may pressure them to drink.

Another example is the application of social skills training to social phobia or shyness. People who suffer from social phobia or shyness are not ignorant of social cues, but they tend to avoid specific situations in which their limitations might cause them embarrassment. Social skills training can help these patients to improve their communication and social skills so that they will be able to mingle with others or go to job interviews with greater ease and self-confidence.

Some studies indicate that the social skills training given to patients with shyness and social phobia can be applied to those with avoidant personality disorder, but more research is needed to differentiate among the particular types of social skills that benefit specific groups of patients, rather than treating social skills as a single entity. When trainers apply social skills training to the treatment of other personality disorders, they focus on the specific skills required to handle the issues that emerge with each disorder. For example, in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCD), social skills trainers focus on helping patients with OCD to deal with heavy responsibilities and stress.

social skills therapy for children help them acquire social skills to teach them people specific sets of social competencies.

Many childrens nowadays due to the rising reliance on technology and sterotypes also require therapy for social skills in order to cope in school.